Older and Wiser

posted by Momo Fali on February 4, 2013

As I sat on the plane waiting to leave Houston and Dad 2.0 Summit, after a weekend of listening to men speak freely and without judgement about what it’s like to be a father (in a space where I thought I might feel like an interloper, but instead was welcomed freely and without judgement) I noticed a young man who was probably a little older than my daughter. He entered the plane and tossed his scruffy, One-Directionesque, side-swept hair, all brown and wavy in the style that makes teen girls swoon. I eyed his bright smile which was likely just freed from braces and wires.

A few feet from him was a man shoving his heavy, black bag into the overhead bin. He was bald, wearing wire-rimmed, round glasses that matched his belly. I guessed he was 60. He looked tired.

There were such obvious physical differences between them that I couldn’t help but wonder, despite the fact they were males, with whom I had more in common.

Want to guess where this is going?

I’m nearing my 42nd birthday so if the boy was 18 and the man was 60, I’m squarely in the older group and despite what you may think, that actually isn’t all bad. Sure, he has that belly to contend with and he probably has his fair share of aches and pains, but I’m going to go ahead and state that the elder fellow has better taste in music. Zeppelin wins. Every time. Plus, he doesn’t have to worry about doing his hair.

It was also legal for me to order a vodka and cranberry on the flight and I apparently looked just haggard enough that the flight attendant gave me a drink, plus another one, and both of them were free. She said, “I always pick someone to be nice to and you look like you need it.” Another good thing about being older is that you know insults are easier to bear when there is free alcohol involved.

Although I don’t doubt the young, wavy-haired boy has a lot to offer, he can’t possibly be sure of himself yet. He thinks he’s sure of himself, but that’s just his body trying to trick his mind. If he’s a typical teen, he doesn’t know the challenges he will face. And, there will be many.

School is hard, girls are harder, but throw in kids and a mortgage and then we’ll see if that kid doesn’t look like he could use some free liquor. Also, another benefit of age is knowing when to STOP drinking free booze. There are many times that I wouldn’t have quit at two. Go ahead and ask all the friends who’ve held my hair back.

Just because you look like you’re strong and capable it doesn’t mean you are. And, I don’t think I was even confident enough to make that statement at the age of 18. Sure, I’m capable! Do you think I’m, like, capable? What about that guy in my English class? Does he think so? Where’s my Aqua Net? I CAN’T BE CAPABLE WITHOUT BIG BANGS!

Me and that 60 year old, we may have issues, but we have the history to show we can make it through them. Either that, or we’ll die trying.

Pass the vodka.

    Comments

  • Melisa


    LOVE.

    • Momo Fali


      Love you more!

  • Liz


    *clink-clink*

    • Momo Fali


      Cheers, Liz!

  • Chris


    Awesome doesn’t have an age. And you, my friend, are exactly that.

  • Pedro


    You know I still don’t believe when you tell your age… I think you’re just showing off… so you can brag about free alcohol ;)

  • tara


    :) You rock Momo!

    “I can’t be capable without bangs!!” Hilarious

  • Toni


    So true. I always get teary eyed at school functions when I look at the little innocent faces of my grandchildren and the youth ..and think the same things! :)

  • Mama D


    Loved this! So true.

  • AlisonH


    Love it. Even if for me it would be maybe hot chocolate rather than booze.

  • Whit


    I had bangs once. Also, Zepplin on vinyl.

  • Jamie@SouthMainMuse


    This was so great and identifiable. I was worried that you were going to rag the older guy. I’m getting ready to spend the day with second graders on a field trip. And I don’t think there will be vodka (or hot chocolate) offered on the bus.

  • Arnebya


    Vodka. Free. I still can’t stop at 2. That’s a story (or 5) for another time. It’s funny how “OK with” turning 40 I am. I have my days where I see the pretty 20 somethings and I smile because HAAAAAAAAAAAAAA YOU BROADS AIN’T GOT A CLUE ABOUT ALL O’ THIS THAT IS LIFE. I love how they all think they have everything figured out and I’m just yelling at them to get off my lawn. I don’t even purport to know everything, not yet. But I can damn sure tell you I’d rather, at this stage of life and all that I’ve learned, be here than 18. (Although I knew all the answers and was hot at 18 and never once thought “say, think that’s enough vodka for tonight?”

  • Zak


    You’re a kickass dad blogger.

  • meleah rebeccah


    Absolutely, fabulous.

  • Toni


    That 40ish age is a strange time, isn’t it? It’s like, you still think you are 30, wish you were 25 but feel like you’re 50. You realize your parents are aging, your friends are showing gray and their kids are approaching high school…but, but, but…Sigh. At the same time, it feels good to know who you are and what you stand for in this life…and of course to be able to drink on a plane, that’s a total bonus. :) I know you can never look back and wish things were different…though I often wish, so bad, that I was the person then that I am today. Oh well…*CHEERS*

  • Colleen


    Here here! If there’s one thing I know for certain, its that I’d NEVER want to be 18 ever again!!!

  • Trackbacks

  • Trackback from Dad 2.0 Summit: Next Year, I’m Singing | DadScribe
    Monday, 4 February, 2013

    [...] Daddy in a Strange Land and Clark Kent’s Lunchbox and Bobblehead Dad and the Daddy Doctrines and Momo Fali and the Muskrat and Lesbian Dad and Bitchin’ Wives Club and the Captain and Laid Off Dad and [...]

Leave a Comment

Your email is never shared.
Required fields are marked *